Maddie Di Muccio

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An Open Letter to Nicolas Pappalardo, PC Leader Patrick Brown's Chief of Staff

Posted on February 2, 2017 at 11:45 PM



 


Dear Nicholas,


 

Some readers may not know who you are. You're the Chief of Staff for Patrick Brown, the Leader of the PC Party of Ontario. As the Chief of Staff for a party that wants to lead our province in 2018, big things are expected from you. Maturity and discipline, for example. Professionalism. And respect.


 

Yesterday, a producer for Newstalk1010 - the Nightside with Barb DiGiulio - contacted you for comment on my allegation that during the PC Party candidate selection process, the committee inappropriately brought up my family and status as a mother, and then openly questioned whether this could be an impediment to the party. I felt I had a responsibility to myself and every mother in Ontario to go public with this.


 

Barb shared your telephone conversation with her listeners. The first thing that came out of your mouth was that I was a "piece of work."


 

Really?


 

Are all mothers who discuss healthcare, education, and ideas on making the province function well also a piece of work in your world? Should they stay at home and mind the kids? Or perhaps you had an issue that I am a mother who has an opinion - like many of us - and speaks openly about it?


 

Guess what, Nicholas? Lots of women and mothers have opinions on issues and want to be part of the exciting work of creating a better government. Us moms raise our kids and manage our careers. We want to ensure our children have a chance at a good future and we want our elderly parents safely taken care of. We dream of succeeding and overcoming challenges and obstacles. Women - and especially working moms - work very, very hard managing their busy lives and the lives of others. And finally, we want to make sure we're taken seriously. That we are heard, and that in addition to the incredible joys and challenges of raising our kids, we have opportunities. For you to tell a member of the media that I was a "piece of work" for openly talking about these issues speaks more about you, not me.


 

And it speaks volumes about how your party views mothers. This "piece of work" can only imagine the types of backroom, behind-the-scenes conversations you like to have amongst yourselves. Is the PC Party as inclusive as they insist they are?


 

Frankly, Nicholas, I'm stunned that Patrick Brown continues to back up your lack of judgement. When you messed up here: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/brown-sex-ed-chief-of-staff-1.3747088, Brown stood up for you. Will he forgive your lack of a filter this time around?


 

Nicholas, like you, I want the PC's to win. Families are struggling. Businesses are struggling. And us moms, well, we carry a lot on our shoulders.


 

But with folks like you at the helm, I think you just keep proving that the real piece of work is yourself.






Canadian values should bring us together - not divide us

Posted on September 8, 2016 at 8:35 PM

During a radio interview earlier today, CPC leadership hopeful Kellie Leitch said she wanted to start a discussion on the topic of Canadian values. Accepting her invitation, I would like to explain that a party based on conservative ideals should avoid this issue altogether, as we have done with other divisive issues in the past.

 

Although we often talk about a "big blue tent" within the Canadian conservative movement, there are many occasions when the various factions disagree on fundamental issues. This is healthy in political parties and promotes debate.

 

The Canadian conservative movement is a mixed bag of Atlantic Canada red Tories, Quebec nationalists, Upper Canada elites, Ford Nation, prairie populists, Reformers, progressives, social conservatives, green conservatives, and libertarians. (My apologies if I missed anyone).

 

Even within this group, there are some issues that conservatives will not discuss in polite company. For example, Stephen Harper's CPC made the discussion of reproductive rights and access to abortion verboten. The abortion issue creates strong divisions between conservatives and risks rendering the very fabric of the conservative alliance.

 

That's why for years, the official position of the Conservative Party of Canada on abortion is, "We have no official position."

Although this non-position seems very practical, I raise this in connection to Kellie Leitch's intentions to make "Canadian values" a key plank in her leadership campaign.

 

Canadian values are the set of inherent principles and ethics that we have adopted that govern our behaviour. We may not recognize our behaviour while at home, but these values definitely shine through when we travel abroad. I have travelled to enough places in the world to know that Canadians are unique. As Canadians we often get teased when visiting the U.S. for being so polite, but I interpret our politeness as our ingrained personal respect for the people we interact with. We Canadians, for example, are famous for saying "I'm sorry" for everything from accidentally bumping someone on the sidewalk to interrupting conversations.

 

There is no government-published handbook at the departures lounge at the airport that instructs Canadians to be polite when travelling in foreign countries. It's just a behaviour that we abide by because we value respect of others.

 

The key point to understanding Canadian values is that they are adopted organically. Canadian values cannot be indoctrinated into our national character by any government institution.

 

As a daughter of immigrants, I know that my parents' values line up with their adopted Canada. No amount of testing or screening was required to complete this transformation. Like most people, they valued the same freedom and democracy we cherish in Canada. I would even argue that most immigrants coming from places whose governments don't value democracy value it immensely here - and is one of the reasons they seek to create a life this great country.

 

My parents' Canadian experience is not unlike many thousands of immigrants who arrive in Canada each year.

 

It's too easy for politicians to stir up divisive rhetoric in hopes of election successes. Opponents of Leitch's Canadian values question are claiming she's bringing in offensive "Trumpism" into politics. But the truth is that nobody in politics today played the group identity card as well as Barack Obama. That's why race relations in the United States is likely at its lowest point in more than 50 years: Obama's successes at getting re-elected may have translated into votes, but he has done nothing for the betterment of American society.

 

As conservatives, we need to decide if we want to focus on dividing us into different camps or focus instead on the principles that unite us as a nation.

 

I prefer the latter.

 


Wynne's Climate Change plan has great consequences of another kind

Posted on June 8, 2016 at 5:45 PM


Living in a northern climate, Ontarians are quite sensitive to the costs of heating our homes in the winter months. Each year, we hear dreadful stories of seniors and low income families having to choose between home heating and food.

Things are about to change for the worse.

Earlier today, Kathleen Wynne announced her strategy on Climate Change. While she didn't mention the earlier "leaked" strategy of eliminating natural gas heating altogether, she did promise to hike the costs of natural gas heating - to a point where it will become unaffordable for most of us.

Natural gas is a fossil fuel, but it also emits 50 to 60% less CO2 as compared to oil or coal. Under the premier's plan, natural gas heating will only be for the very rich. The alternative for most of us will be electric heat: which presently costs an average of $3,000 more annually than heating with natural gas today.

Kathleen Wynne intends to punish Ontarians for living in a northern climate. We won't be able to use any less energy to heat our homes, but we will all pay more for the luxury of living here.

Yesterday was Tax Freedom day. We worked the first 5+ months of the year to meet our obligation to the taxman. Any money we make from here on, we get to use towards our living expenses, such as our food and accommodation.

Let's put Wynne's extra heating costs into perspective. According to employment website Workopolis, the average Ontarian earns $49,088 a year. If the first five months went towards tax obligations, that leaves $28,635 after tax income. Wynne is proposing to take more than a whopping 10% of your after tax income for more expensive electric heat.

Ontarians are already under terrible economic strain. The average mortgage debt in this province is approximately $193,000, according to an article published in the Wall Street Journal. That commitment alone means most taxpayers are struggling to keep ahead. In fact, a recent article by the CBC predicted dire consequences for many households if interest rates were to rise; or job losses, like we've seen in other parts of the country, were to hit Ontario.

In short, Kathleen Wynne is proposing the economic ruin of too many families who are just getting by today with her reckless Climate Change strategy.

Liberals are proposing their Climate Change strategy will cost ordinary Ontarians like you and me an extra $8.3 Billion. That's twice the amount of money we invest in our justice system, and more than what we spend on post secondary education.

There are going to be consequences to the level of government services that we currently have. Our hospitals, schools, children with special needs, mental health services, and a slew of other services are already facing the brunt of the austerity measures Wynne is forcing on them as she continues to divert valuable public resources to her personal political ideals.

If Kathleen Wynne gets her way, how many doctors, nurses, teachers, fire fighters and police officers will have to lose their job to pay for her Climate Change plan? How many hospitals, schools and colleges will be forced to close to pay the $8.3 billion she has ear-marked for the environment?

But it's the private sector that will ultimately bear the biggest burden.

Last night I stopped by my local convenience store to pick up a few things. I thought it was closed because most of the lights were off. Only the neon "Open" sign made me aware that the store wasn't actually closed. The local shopkeeper told me that he turned down his lights to save energy costs. That's the state we are in today.


After Wynne implements her Climate Change strategy, he might not be able to afford to keep his neon "Open" sign going too.

 

 



Grant programs fail to help the most needy students

Posted on May 4, 2016 at 4:20 PM

Here's my first column for Troy Media: http://www.troymedia.com/2016/05/04/help-needy-students/

Thrilled to be signed on as a syndicated columnist for Troy Media

Posted on April 29, 2016 at 3:45 PM

I'm grateful for the opportunity to be offered a weekly syndicated column with Troy Media, a media outlet that produces content for over 1,800 media (traditional and website) outlets in print and online.

In the past, I was a regular columnist with the Toronto Sun, and I look forward to engaging readers across Canada in meaningful discourse once again.

http://www.troymedia.com/about-2/testimonials/

With Mulcair out, the Conservative Party Leadership race becomes that much more important

Posted on April 10, 2016 at 9:00 PM

NDP delegates voted today to fire party leader, Tom Mulcair. As shocking as this vote was, the greater shock may be the decision of delegates to adopt the LEAP Manifesto - which is a sharp turn to the left from the 2015 NDP election platform.

 

The next year will be dominated by various NDP leadership candidates portraying themselves to be the best person to sell the LEAP Manifesto ideals. That almost guarantees the next leader of the NDP will come from either Toronto or Vancouver. I simply don't see the LEAP Manifesto attracting much new member support in other parts of the country.

 

The NDP did not consider what ousting Thomas Mulcair, the former Quebec Minister of the Environment, will mean for its future electoral hopes. With Mulcair out, the 14 seats that the NDP hold in Quebec are almost certainly in play.

 

Conservatives need to take a long hard look at how they - and not the Liberals - can capture the majority of these mostly rural Quebec seats. Voters in these ridings found Jack Layton and Thomas Mulcair as people they could relate to. I believe that the Conservatives need an equally relatable leader in order to win these extremely important seats.

 

Stephen Harper won three consecutive federal elections thanks to, in large part, the election outcomes in the Province of Quebec.

 

It's an admittedly curious statement to make considering that the Conservatives never won the most seats in Quebec in any of these elections. Yet in 2006 and 2008 it was due to the strength of the Bloc Quebecois - and in 2011 the NDP, that for those parties winning the most seats in Quebec paved the way for the Conservatives' victory. Had Quebec voted Liberal in any of these elections, the results would have been quite different for Canada.

 

Fast forward to the 2015 election, and this time, the Liberals win the majority of Quebec seats. Unfortunately, the Quebec seats that Trudeau took from a weakened NDP directly resulted in the Liberal majority in Parliament.

 

In 2019, Conservatives cannot hope to rely on a resurgent NDP or Bloc to siphon off Quebec support from Trudeau. If Conservatives want to return to Government in the next election, the key battleground will not be the 416/905 areas that the Toronto centric media like to pronounce.

 

Conservatives can only win by taking the plurality of seats in Quebec.

 

The stakes couldn't be higher for Canada in 2019. After leaving the country in very good financial footing despite enduring one of the worst global recessions in modern history, Conservatives are shocked to see Trudeau and Morneau fritter away our strength by selling off our gold reserves and spending recklessly towards record deficits.

 

One only need to look to Justin Trudeau's mentor, Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne, to see what's in store for Canada if Trudeau is re-elected in 2019 with another majority. Ontarians have seen their manufacturing jobs leave the province as a result of Wynne's ideology, and the province's infrastructure is collapsing under the weight of a record $300 Billion debt. Ontario is now the world's most indebted sub-sovereign borrower.

 

Is that the future we want for Canada?

 

There has never been a more important time for the Conservative Party of Canada to choose a leader who can win in 2019.

So far, we've only had two candidates who have filed to run.

 

In light of Mulcair's staggering loss, I believe that Maxime Bernier is the most qualified of the potential candidates for this position.

He's held several impressive senior level cabinet positions including Industry, Foreign Affairs, and Small Business. Unlike Trudeau, Bernier also has considerable experience in the private sector too.

 

His conservative bona fides are strong. Bernier knows it's impossible to grow prosperity by growing our public debt. He understands the private sector cannot prosper by the reckless spending from public sector.

By reducing red tape and unshackling the potential of our small businesses and entrepreneurs, Bernier knows that opportunities, jobs, and innovation will bring on a new era of success and prosperity of Canada. He knows it because it's his record.

Maxime Bernier can win seats for Conservatives right across Canada.

 

Most importantly, being enormously popular in his home province, Maxime Bernier is the only Conservative Party of Canada leadership candidate that can win the plurality of seats in Quebec.

 

By doing so, he stops Justin Trudeau in his tracks.

 

 

 

Meet what's left of the Neville-Lake family

Posted on February 23, 2016 at 5:55 PM

This morning, in live time, the public heard the excruciating, agonizing account of what the Neville-Lake family went through when they lost their three children in a senseless drunk driving crash.

 

The criminal was Marco Muzzo.

 

The victims were Millie, Harry, Daniel and their grandfather - and of course their parents, Jennifer and Edward, grandparents, uncles, aunts, cousins, relatives, employers, teachers, friends, neighbors - I could go on, but you get the point. The community grieved for the outstanding loss of these parents; in their mom's own words as she faced Muzzo in court today, "I'm going to show you how your choices became my consequences."

 

What followed was a gut wrenching account of what she and her husband have been through.

 

For example, she remembered asking the police in bewildered disbelief if all of her children were gone: "All of them...? Not one left?"

 

We learned that she often paces her empty home - once a loud, joyful place - looking for her children, wondering where they are.

 

We discovered that she watched her dying daughter's cervical collar fill with blood as she lay beside her in the hospital bed; the doctors keeping her remaining two kids alive on life support so that she and their dad could say goodbye.

 

She explained, in a courtroom in front of a judge and Mr. Muzzo, that she needed 20 pallbearers for the mass devastation wrought on her family.

 

We learned that the children's father, Edward, said his life was destroyed "beyond repair;" so much was this stay-at-home dad's pain excruciating that he surrendered his gun license to police because of how he felt.

 

Jennifer and Edward told us that their own existence, now, was pointless, as they struggle with their pain; the thought of suicide an option, but their faith in God holding them back.

 

I say all of these things, which make us uncomfortable, because we already know so much about Marco Muzzo and everything that he lost, but very little of the Neville-Lake's staggering loss, their everyday existence - a stark contrast to what Marco Muzzo's life could have been. We know he was about to get married; was young, wealthy, the entire world in front of him and all of it lost in a matter of seconds.

 

The media has a habit of focusing on the crime and the criminal, rarely the victim.

 

And though Mr. Muzzo's lawyer spoke to the media defending his client in the past during court hearings, today, after 15 victim impact statements, he said nothing, declining to talk to reporters.

 

Today's play by play account of what this family has been condemned to should be a wake -up call for all of us.

 

They are owed everything. Our laws, our community, our sanctity for human life should shield and protect this family.

 

When asked by the press if Jennifer Neville hated Marco Muzzo, she replied it wasn't a path she wanted to go down.

 

While it's easy for the rest of us to feel contempt and hatred for Marco Muzzo, for Jennifer and Edward that emotion would be like facing the devil himself.

 

Please keep this family in your prayers tonight.

 

Please don't forget them, ever.

 

 

 


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